Leap Years And Orioles

This is a leap year. If you want to know the easiest way to remember when it’s a leap year, check to see if the Summer Olympics are being held. If they are, it’s a leap year.

I was desperate to see if the Orioles had any hope this year so I’d have something positive to write about, so I decided to look back at the team’s record during leap years. Here we go. (Note that up until 1954, the Orioles are still the St. Louis Browns.)

1904: 69-87 (.428), 29 games back
1908: 83-69 (.546), 6.5 games back
1912: 53-101 (.344), 53 games back
1916: 79-75 (.513), 12 games back
1920: 76-77 (.497), 21.5 games back
1924: 74-78 (.487), 17 games back
1928: 82-72 (.532), 19 games back
1932: 63-91 (.409), 44 games back
1936: 57-95 (.375), 44.5 games back
1940: 67-87 (.435), 23 games back
1944: 89-65 (.578), won division
1948: 59-94 (.386), 37 games back
1952: 64-90 (.416), 31 games back
1956: 69-85 (.448), 28 games back
1960: 89-65 (.578), 8 games back
1964: 97-65 (.599), 2 games back
1968: 91-71 (.562), 12 games back
1972: 80-74 (.519), 5 games back
1976: 88-74 (.543), 10.5 games back
1980: 100-62 (.617), 3 games back
1984: 85-77 (.525), 19 games back
1988: 54-107 (.335), 34.5 games back
1992: 89-73 (.549), 7 games back
1996: 88-74 (.543), 4 games back
2000: 74-88 (.457), 13.5 games back
2004: 78-84 (.481), 23 games back
2008: 68-93 (.422), 28.5 games back
2012: ?

There you have it – the Orioles have won the division once during a leap year. The rest of the time, they’ve either been decently competitive or awful. There’s no in-between, it seems. I was really hoping there’d be some sort of trend in this data, but there really isn’t much of a trend to follow other than the Orioles suck and occasionally suck less.

And here I was hoping to find something groundbreaking. Oh well. At least I tried, right?

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