In The Land Of Hope And Dreams: Giants Are World Series Champions Once Again

A Civic Center Plaza kind of crowd. (Jen Mac Ramos)

Take a time machine to 10 years ago. Find your 10-years-ago self and tell them that the World Series that year was awful, you know it, but in 10 years, everything will be okay.

“NO. STUPID RALLY MONKEY,” your old self might say. “SCREW THE ANGELS.”

You’ll calm your old self down — or try to at least — and say, “In 10 years, the Giants will have won the World Series twice in three years.”

Your old self won’t believe it, continuing the curse everything about the Angels.

Say that to your 2007 self, too. And maybe even your 2010 self.

It still feels improbable.

The Giants won the World Series twice in three years? No way. Not possible. Come on.

That’s just crazytalk.

There’s just absolutely no way that’ll ever happen.

Right?


Game four went into extra innings, just as the narrative drew it up. Or something.

Matt Cain on the mound — perfect man at the right time for the Giants to win it all again.

Maybe he was just good, not great tonight. Maybe he should have not hung one too many sliders. But going seven innings and only giving up three runs isn’t so bad.

It was enough to keep the Giants in the game, should their offense get around to actually doing something.

And that’s the frustrating part about this team sometimes: oh, hey, there might be a Caining imminent.

You put that in a postseason game and the stress levels just go higher.

It’s possible that this game brought the stress levels to, “Oh crap oh crap oh crap I’m going to throw up.”

No, not just possible. More like, “Yep.”


Buster Posey hit a two-run home run to get the lead back for the Giants, albeit temporarily.

And you know what? That’s good enough. Without that, the Giants might not have won. Posey certainly needed that as well, with a less than Posey average in the postseason.

For a guy who just finished his first full season in baseball, he’s won two rings, been named rookie of the year, and might be this year’s National League MVP.

His first full season.

Let that sink in for a bit.


The Giants have a lot of big name players. Buster Posey, Tim Lincecum, Pablo Sandoval.

But with this team, even the not-so-big name players are just as huge.

The 10th inning would not have been the deciding factor if not for Ryan Theriot’s base hit and Marco Scutaro’s run-driving hit.

The go-ahead run was scored by Ryan friggin’ Theriot. Who would’ve guessed it would be him?

That’s just what he does, I guess.


Pablo Sandoval was named the World Series MVP. If you had to pick out one guy from this team to be the MVP, it would be him.

As he once said, “SORRY ‘BOUT IT.”


Twenty years ago, a photo ran in the San Francisco Chronicle of a young Brandon Crawford looking sad. The Giants were Florida-bound at one point and that wasn’t something that many wanted. It appeared that Crawford was one of them.

Twenty years later, you can now call him World Series Champion Brandon Crawford, San Francisco Giants shortstop.

Some people don’t get to live out their childhood dreams and goals. Life gets in the way and you grow up and maybe it just doesn’t work the way you drew it up when you were five.

But when that does happen, you realize just how lucky you are. Sometimes, that part of you that holds on to five-year-old self’s dream never dies.


Ryan Vogelsong is now a World Series Champion.

From being drafted by the Giants, to being traded to the Pirates, to playing in Japan, then making it with the Giants.

Now, he has a ring with the team that he started out with. Now, he’s the pitcher that no one expected him to be and more.

He’s always of the opinion that he doesn’t care about your opinion and he is going to do his best to prove you wrong.

Here he is now, with a ring of his own and standing his own amongst the National League pitchers.

That’s a narrative for the books.


Maybe Hunter Pence hasn’t been the hitter everyone wanted him to be.

There’s no denying that everyone wants him to be better than he has been.

“He could have” or “he should have” or “he would have.”

At the end of the day, that could be said of a lot of players. Yes, it would be absolutely wonderful if he hit like Sandoval did in the World Series. But now’s not the time to analyze Pence’s on-the-field downfalls and what-have-you.

Some ballplayers have that “veteran presence” that can bring the team together. Maybe it’s just a good personality to get everyone into the “WIN NOW” mindset.

Yogi Berra did say that 90 percent of the game is half-mental. Maybe he had a point there and Pence picked up on it.


The Giants were on their last legs against the Cincinnati Reds in the NLDS.

Down two games to none and they came back and managed to win and advance.

The Giants were down and almost out against the St. Louis Cardinals in the NLCS.

Game five, down three games to one with Barry Zito on the mound. They forced a game seven and won.

Everyone picked the Detroit Tigers to win. Everyone counted the Giants out. Tigers in five, Tigers in six, something to that effect.

The Giants are used to proving people wrong. They did just that in 2010, they did it again this year in every stage of the postseason. And even before that, edging out the always-leading Los Angeles Dodgers by a huge margin toward the end of September.

Odds are against the Giants? They’ll accept the challenge.

Giants in four.

On this train, dreams will not be thwarted. On this train, faith will be rewarded.

And maybe—maybe—that was just it for the Giants.

One thought on “In The Land Of Hope And Dreams: Giants Are World Series Champions Once Again

  1. ziggyca11 says:

    Yes, and take that Mr Tim McCarver ! You always said “we” when the Tigers was sort of rallying or not ! Congratulations Mac !

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